SOON TO BE A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE – TO THE RIVER

IN PRAISE OF BENEDICT’S BROTHER

General The Lord Dannatt, GCB. CBE. MC. DL. former Chief of the General Staff.
“I congratulate Tricia Walker and The Royal British Legion for working together over this special edition of Benedict’s Brother and I very much hope that it not only raises a useful amount of money, but helps to honour the memory of the Far East Prisoners of War through the imaginative memorial at the National Arboretum”.

Norma Heyman, TV, Theatre & Film Producer
“A wonderful and evocative story that will be visually stunning on the screen. The images of Thailand, of the monastery and the monks are the perfect visual backdrop on which to play out the spiritual adventure that Benedict undertakes. The parallel narrative told via Benedict’s uncle’s diary entries during his time as a prisoner of war will provide a visceral and moving juxtaposition to Benedict’s story.”

Sally Lucas, New York, FEPOW relative 
“An extraordinary book, beautifully written and heartbreaking. Felt that I was taking the journey with the writer, smelling the flowers and listening to the river flowing, and sobbed my heart out at the brutality and inhuman treatment of all the prisoners of war. Would urge everyone to take some quality time and quietly read this, it helps to heal some of the scars left behind by the loss of the forgotten ones. Importantly their legacy is now in the hands of their children and the Hut and Garden at the National Arboretum is a reflective and inspirational place to visit.”

Amanda Waring, Dignity Campaigner, Actress
“An exquisite book that is both poignant and real in its exploration of suffering, forgiveness, and death. The juxtaposition of the past with the present ensures the reader is held throughout and the evocative sense of place is so well executed. Highly recommended.”

Roger Tagholm, Publishing Industry Journalist
“A touching novel about a woman journeying to scatter her uncle’s ashes. For the service a line of Buddhist monks fans out across the famous bridge, like a saffron –robed sunset. One of my favourite books.”

Mike Curry, Former Soldier
“I was inspired to become involved with this important appeal after I was given a copy of the book. It is so different to any other book of this period of our military history. It is incredibly poignant. I was astounded by how different it is and I’ve now read it twice. I urge everyone to read it and I thoroughly recommend it to all ages, especially schools. You won’t be able to put it down and I can’t wait to see the film. This is for my father and many like him, but also for all those who wear The Burma Star and those who never made it back. Although they were told not to talk about it, the time has come now for our children to “Beat the Drum” because they are the pilgrims who will make sure that the term “Forgotten Army” is banished from our history books.

Beat the drum, buy the book!”

And just a few of the amazing reviews for the book on Amazon

Enjoyed this book immensely. Beautifully descriptive

A wonderfully descriptive emotional rollercoaster

Fantastic and timeless. An easy read but an emotionally engaging one. A real page turner

5 Stars awarded – need I say more!

It’s a book that makes me smile when I decide to read it again. It’s a keeper!

The story is simple,and so easy to identify with,due to the very inclusive style in which it is written. I felt comfortable with the characters,and,although the journey Benedict makes is to the other side of the world physically, there are no limits to how far she strides towards self-awareness.

Fab book strongly recommend

A beautiful, moving story which draws parallels between past and present – and best of all, has love and understanding at the end of it.

Enjoyed this book immensely. Beautifully descriptive

Just read it – Once you start reading you will simply want to keep on turning the pages until you reach the end. You will be drawn into taking the journey with the characters which you will find challenging compelling and emotional but a journey non the less worth taking. It is a beautifully written story by Tricia Walker that will pull at the heart, but enrich your own journey through life if you let it.

Fantastic, poetic, enlightening!

I read Benedict’s Brother in two days. I simply couldn’t put it down.


Beautifully written, the language evokes vivid images of a far away place, yet brings forth emotions of a very familiar kind. This is a story of despair, yet hope; of abandonment, yet finding oneself and one’s place in the world’ of losing faith, yet finding enlightenment. Benedict’s story is at once sad and hopeful. We feel her emotions on every page, with every thought. We sympathize with her, understand her anger at her brother, and feel the pain she endures. The author’s portrayal of Thailand is palpable – you can almost smell the scents, taste the food, and feel the elements. Benedict’s Brother will take you on a journey into yourself, through history, and far away places. It will remind you of what’s important. And it will make you weep. This book is begging to be told in a visual format and I cannot wait to see it translated on screen. But don’t wait ’til then – read the book and enjoy it at your own pace!

Page turning prose

Benedict’s Brother is full of light and shade, hope, and promise. It is a compelling read, set in a memorable landscape, surrounded by characters as colourful and bold as if they had been painted on canvas by Titian; a beautiful composition. The story of Benedict, her troubled life, her search for absolution, her journey to find inner peace as well as make amends with her brother, will bring you to the edge of your own mortality. This book could only be written by someone who has been on their own road to Damascus, for this is a journey towards enlightenment. A journey to find that still small voice we all crave for. It is page turning poetry, filled with spine tingling moments of what it is that makes us human. If you can read this book and not shed a single tear, then I’m sorry, for your soul is forever damned. I cannot wait to see this translated from page to Big screen.”

A heartwarming story, vividly described. It will be amazing to see it come to life on the screen. Give me more

Lovingly crafted by the author, a wonderful, original novel.

Highly recommended read, a Christmas gift that will be cherished and relished by friends or family.

Touches your soul. Beautifully written from the heart. It touches every emotion to the core. This amazing author knows how to paint with words. It takes you right into that world. I coudn’t put the book down and read it in just under a week.

A moving, uplifting and timeless story.


A fabulous story. Easy to read, but still a moving and uplifting journey of a novel. Can’t wait for the film to come out!

The dream of a ride into life and beyond

Benedict’s Brother is full of light and shade, hope and promise. A compelling read, set in a memorable landscape, surrounded by characters as colourful and bold as if they had been painted on canvas; a beautiful composition. The story of Benedict, her troubled life, her search for absolution, her journey to find inner peace and make amends with her dying brother will bring you to the edge of your own mortality. This book could only be written by someone who has been on their own road to Damascus, for this is a journey towards enlightenment, to find that still small voice we all crave for. It is page turning poetry, filled with spine tingling moments of what it is that makes us human. If you can read this book and not shed a single tear, then I’m sorry, your soul is lost forever. I cannot wait to see this translated from page to Big screen.

Just read it, honestly you will be glad that you did

Having had the pleasure of meeting the author, I took the novel with me on holiday so that i could have a non-distracted read. I couldn’t put it down.

I smiled, I was sad, I was happy, I cried. As a writer myself I really identify with others who create a very visual backdrop. Tricia’s descriptions made me feel as if I was there with Benedict on her journey, from the meeting with the lawyer, to arriving at the airport and her journey into the unknown. An emotional read that leaves you with a teary smile on your face. Buy, delve into Benedict’s world and enjoy. Can’t wait for the film.

I met the author at a writers’ festival and heard her backstory of the humble beginnings of this heartwrenching tale of endings. Intrigued, it took me a while to warm to this book until it gripped me by the throat and I was hooked. The arc of the story’s strands is very satisfying and beautifully written with an emotional intensity that lingers in the memory long after.

This is an excellent read, beautifully composed and handled the atmosphere of Thailand and history well, incredible to think it took so long to find a publisher

From the moment Benedict is told of her Uncle Erno’s bequest – money and an instruction to scatter his ashes from the Bridge on the River Kwai – we are with her on a journey of understanding. Why did Uncle Erno want his ashes returned to where he was a prisoner of the Japanese during WW2? And – almost incidental at first – why did Benedict’s brother Antony become a Buddhist monk in Thailand?
Written in diary style, Benedict’s Brother is a deceptively simple tale of love and loss, life and death, in the remote north-east of Thailand. Uncle Erno’s bequest means that Benedict can also visit her brother – her last living relative – and perhaps gain some answers.
Beauty and fresh experience is all around – Benedict is captivated by the place, the local people, by the monastery’s daily rituals, and by her brother’s friends. As a foreigner in a strange land she is a young woman we can all identify with – struggling to make sense of everything. There is humour even in her frustrations, and her journey reveals some surprising and unexpected contrasts – not least when she visits the River Kwai.
Excerpts from Uncle Erno’s fragile wartime diary reveal the depths of cruelty imposed during the building of the railway, and yet Benedict’s experience there is one of the most moving parts of the book.
A beautiful, moving story which draws parallels between past and present – and best of all, has love and understanding at the end of it.

If you’ve ever been lucky enough to go to Kanchanaburi, in Western Thailand, this book will resonate. And if you haven’t been there, it will make you want to.

It captures the beautiful, spiritual journey of Benedict, a young woman, who has been tasked with scattering the ashes of her late uncle (a former Prisoner of War who worked in atrocious conditions under the Japanese on the Thai-Burma Railway during the Second World War) on the River Kwai. This actual Thai landscape is beautiful, haunting and poignant… all qualities of this novel.

If it all sounds a bit highbrow and serious, insert some lovely and amusing incidents with pet geckos, Buddhist monks engaging in tomfoolery on a Harley Davidson, and some very appropriate song lyrics from recent pop culture.

I read this last year, just before I had my baby. It’s such a peaceful journey, it really was lovely to read at this time in my life. When my, now fourteen month old, Little Lady affords me the time, I’d love to read it again and again. Buy it and stick in on your Kindle… and enjoy the journey!

Came very promp in July , fantastic amazing story of ones journey a truly uplifting funny sad story all rolled in to one such a different read for me too well done to the lovely Tricia walker for writing this book, cani wait for the film or next book, I have told a lot of my friends who all say great read

I really loved this book and couldn’t put it down. It really pulls at the heart strings. The title is slightly misleading as Bededict is a girl not a boy. The book explores the relationship of Benedict and her brother. Why did he suddenly give up his life in England to become a Buddhist monk in Thailand? How could he go off and leave her without any explanation when he was her only surviving relative? Only when Benedict visits Thailand to scatter the ashes of her dead uncle from the Bridge Over The River Kwai (a harrowing account of the horror faced by British prisoners at the hands of the Japanese is created) are her questions answered. Despite a tragic finale, the author, Tricia Walker, ensures Benedict’s experiences change her outlook on life and make her a more mature, compassionate, enlightened woman.

This is a very moving, well-written novel about a woman’s emotional journey to find her true self. I found the sections about her uncle’s diary from his prison of war camp the most moving. It brought home how the previous generation suffered for us during World War II. I would never have imagined I’d enjoy a book about Buddhists and motorbikes but I really did! I understand this is Tricia Walker’s first novel. I hope she writes more!

Tricia Walker captures every nuance in Benedict’s maturing character, seamlessly taking the reader through the spiritual journey. Benedict shows tentative trust initially, but we see how she gains maturity by facing up to potentially crippling emotional situations.
I like Benedict. She makes me laugh,she makes me want to shake her at times,but most of all she makes me want to know her better.

She learns acceptance, compassion,self esteem,tolerance,and how it is to feel afraid but face the challenge anyway. That’s life. Good job there’s “Shake, rattle and roll, chocolate, and Mozart”, to help us on our way.

Having had the pleasure of meeting the author, I took the novel with me on holiday so that i could have a non-distracted read. I couldn’t put it down.
I met the author at a writers’ festival and heard her backstory of the humble beginnings of this heartwrenching tale of endings.
Just read it – Once you start reading you will simply want to keep on turning the pages until you reach the end. …

This is an excellent read, beautifully composed and handled the atmosphere of Thailand and history well, incredible to think it took so long to find a publisher.

I enjoyed reading this book more than I expected. It made one think of what POW’s went through and endured while building the Burma railway.